Tennis Therapy

There must be two at least to play tennis. A hundred won’t work either. Thousands would be a completely chaotic event. Two to four really is it to play. Tennis involves hitting a fuzzy ball with a racquet. The ball doesn’t scream when you hit it. There is no violence charge from the ball or onlookers so frustration meant for a person or situation is safe to take out on the ball with the racquet. Baseball works the same way but is not as intimate. Two is ideal. Two people hitting a ball with a racquet towards each other. One releases frustration then shares with the other for them to do the same. It is a dance. It is skill to get out as much frustration as possible before the ball leaves the playing field. This is a good volley, as much tension released as possible without outside interference or pauses. When enough frustration has been let loose, tennis shifts from a stress reducer to an entertainment inducer. It starts getting fun. When stress goes out, the tumor life can come in. In an into ate way. You share this experience with the other person. Ironically, this person you share this beautiful experience of life with is called your opponent in this game. Ironic that we play games with our opposition. But don’t we in life? Don’t we wrestle with the evil in ourselves? We play regularly with right versus wrong when one or the other suits us best in that moment. We manipulate our own minds to feel comfortable with our good or very very bad decisions. We reason with badness, use the wrong when it has purpose for our gain, feel the emotions and not listen to the logic, we fight within ourselves. Others we attend to oppose us, much like the same dance. Tennis is a beautiful analogy for life and our struggle with enjoying that struggle and being comfortable with it a little too much. But tennis continues to thrill my heart to play because it has two more seductive things… uncertainty and speed. You can’t saunter over to the ball as it comes ripping toward you. You can’t be idle or think too hard about the possibilities. It forces you to pay attention, to be in the now, to attend this moment. You have to act quickly to get there in time to have another hit contact the ball. It is exciting. Where will it go? It is here, it is there, on the line, speeding in hard, lobbed with a long ha g time, whatever. Also like life, it is an adventure you miss if you are not paying attention. And things happen erratically. One minute you are great, the next you falter, then you soar with great hangtime through high places then are attacked powerfully. Yes, tennis thrills me, mimics life, unites players with a twist and yields great benefits for playing better and faithfully all the time.